fbpx

Exploring the Depths: A Final Adventure in Bremer Canyon

A Mako shark comes in for a meal

A Final Farewell

The sun cast its golden hues over the horizon as we set out on the Alison Maree.

This was to be our for the final Bremer Canyon killer whale charter of the season.

Excitement pulsed through the air, mingling with a tinge of sadness knowing it was our final journey into these deep, mysterious waters.

Our hopes were high, our spirits eager for the unknown encounters awaiting us.

Today, our route diverged from the usual path.

Determined to maximise our chances of spotting the elusive orcas, we charted a course that took us eastward.

Tracing the intricate contours of the canyon systems below.

With every mile covered, anticipation grew, fuelled by the possibility of encountering these magnificent creatures.

Oil Slicks A Sign?

Our journey took us further west, spanning 16 nautical miles.

And then, just before noon, a telltale sign emerged—a vast oil slick glistening on the surface.

It was a beacon of hope, a signal that we were drawing closer to our elusive quarry.

Approaching the slick, our eyes widened at the sight of a chunk of white flesh adrift in the water.

Yet, apart from the scavenging flesh-footed shearwaters and albatrosses, no other creature graced the vicinity.

Undeterred, we pressed on, guided by the instinct that led us to this point.

Our perseverance bore fruit as we stumbled upon a startling scene—a deceased swordfish.

Its massive frame bearing the unmistakable scars of a predator’s voracious appetite.

Circling the carcass were the enigmatic figures of the ocean—a short-finned mako shark and a sleek smooth hammerhead.

These apex predators, each a marvel of evolution, painted a vivid tableau of life and death in the vast expanse of the sea.

Shark Fin Sighting

The shortfin mako, with its unparalleled speed and agility, commanded attention.

Its metallic blue-grey form darted through the water, a testament to its prowess as one of the ocean’s most efficient hunters.

In its wake, it left a trail of awe and respect, a reminder of the delicate balance that sustains our marine ecosystems.

Amidst the drama unfolding beneath the waves, the skies above teemed with life.

Subantarctic shearwaters, shy albatrosses, and Wilson’s storm petrels danced on the wind, their graceful movements a symphony of flight.

Is This The Final Chance?

But our journey held more surprises yet to unfold.

As the afternoon waned, we encountered two pods of long-finned pilot whales, their majestic forms gliding through the water.

Among them, young calves frolicked under the watchful gaze of their mothers, a poignant reminder of the bonds that unite us all.

As the day drew to a close, we retraced our steps through the familiar waters of Bremer Canyon.

Our hearts heavy with the knowledge that our final search for the orcas had come to naught.

Yet, amidst the disappointment, gratitude blossomed for the countless wonders we had witnessed throughout the season.

Farewell Bremer Canyon

Passing by Glasse Island one last time, we bid farewell to the Australian sea lions, their sleek forms basking on the rocky shores.

Among them, a young pup suckled at its mother’s side, a symbol of hope for the future of these magnificent creatures.

As we steered the Alison Maree homeward for the final time this season, our thoughts turned to the promise of the seasons yet to come.

With each journey into the depths of Bremer Canyon, we embark not only on a quest for adventure but also on a voyage of discovery.

A journey that continues to inspire awe and reverence for the boundless beauty of the ocean and all who call it home.

To view more photos from this expedition visit Facebook

Whale Watching begins in Augusta 25th of May – Join us

A pilot whale skims the water in the Bremer Canyon
By Naturaliste Charter A pilot whale skims the water in the Bremer Canyon
A short nosed mako shark makes a meal of a swordfish
By Naturaliste Charter A short nosed mako shark makes a meal of a swordfish
Pelagic birds are the cleaners of the ocean
By Naturaliste Charter Pelagic birds are the cleaners of the ocean
Passengers watching the ocean action from the Alison Maree
By Naturaliste Charter Passengers watching the ocean action from the Alison Maree

More Articles For You

A Quest for the Elusive Killer Whale

A Quest for the Elusive Killer Whale

Our Quest Begins Our quest for elusive killer whales begins again today after a quiet day on the water yesterday. We were all eager to get out to the hotspot...

Read more
Exploring the Bremer Sub-Basin: Insights from the Deep

Exploring the Bremer Sub-Basin: Insights from the Deep

Bremer Sub-Basin Ecosystem The Bremer Sub-Basin, with its intricate network of submarine canyons plunging to depths exceeding 4500 meters. This stands as a...

Read more
A Great Day in Bremer Bay: Orcas, Pilot Whales, Squid, and a Sperm Whale!

A Great Day in Bremer Bay: Orcas, Pilot Whales, Squid, and a Sperm Whale!

A Day to Remember Exiting the harbour our hopes for the day on the open seas were high. The ocean swell relaxing us into a lull, the opposite of what was to...

Read more